Category Archives: Family Research

In Celebration of “Jackie Robinson Day”

He’s No Longer Forgotten Detroit Negro League Star William Binga’s legacy gets a boost Click the photo above to check out an Hour Detroit Magazine online article about my Binga ancestor, written by Ryan Whirty.  Many thanks to Ryan for … Continue reading

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The Underground Railroad and the Legacy of Black Resistance | The Wright Museum, Detroit

I’m a descendant of the Underground Railroad (UGRR).  My cousin, Barbara Hughes-Smith conducted interviews with many UGRR descendants and African-American history researchers regarding our self-emancipated ancestors. My interview focused on Barbara’s 3rd great grand-uncle Anthony Binga Sr. In 1836, he escaped slavery with … Continue reading

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Grand August Carnival

The Grand August Carnival and Negro Exposition is created by the Chicago Colored Businessmen’s Association and heralded as, “The Greatest Triumph for the Race in the Annals of Chicago History.” The executive committee includes Robert S. Abbott publisher of the Chicago Defender, … Continue reading

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In Honor of Black History Month 2012 | Virginia Slavery

The Binga’s & Cotillier’s Was Virginia The Mother Of Slavery View more presentations from Stratalum My Binga ancestors are thought to have been originally enslaved in Virginia. In the book, “Migrants Against Slavery: Virginians and the Nation” it states: “Mrs. Binga had escaped … Continue reading

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Amherstburg First Baptist Church Sinking

By: Robin Grant | The Winsor Star 12/20/11 AMHERSTBURG, Ont. — A piece of Amherstburg’s history is sinking.  The small Amherstburg First Baptist Church on George Street, built by former  slaves in 1849, has been out of commission since Nov. … Continue reading

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International Underground Railroad Conference | Celebrating the River at Midnight

Last week (October 19–October 21) The Detroit River Project and University of Detroit/Mercy (UDM) co-sponsored the International Underground Railroad Conference, Celebrating the River at Midnight | The Fluid Frontier: Slavery, War, Freedom and the Underground Railroad.  The conference was held to commemorate the 10th anniversary … Continue reading

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A Scandal in the Family | Discovering Adelphia Binga

Below are newspaper headlines involving my 3rd great-grandmother Adelphia Binga and her alleged brother John H. Thomas. The first article, “A Sister’s Devotion” (7.23.1896) tells of Adelphia’s efforts to obtain a pardon for Mr. Thomas from a life sentence on a double murder charge. The article outlines the case and how … Continue reading

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Geraldyne Hodges-Dismond

Geraldyne Hodges is born July 29, 1894 in Chicago, IL and by birth a socialite. “Not quite so long ago there was born in Chicago a bright eyed, brown girl-child.  The joy of her coming, however, was dimmed by sorrow; for her … Continue reading

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Wonders by Women | Adelphia Binga

“Wonders by Women” is an article published in the St. Paul, MN Daily Globe on 2/10/1889, featuring my 3rd great-grandmother Mrs. Adelphia Binga. This is a comprehensive article, where she speaks freely about many aspects of her life. It’s written for the reader’s entertainment, … Continue reading

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Binga Row | Detroit Style Tenements

This wooden frame story-and-a-half slant roof row house built in 1882 was known as “Binga Row.” This transitory housing was created primarily for emancipated slaves migrating into the Northern United States and Canada. The 7 unit tenement was located on the southwest corner of Hastings and Ohio Streets … Continue reading

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